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‘From there it’s no place for the meek’ could mean Slough Creek:


Slough:  a swamp, a lack of progress, a state of moral degradation or spiritual dejection


Meek - mild, submissive, humble, modest, Joseph Meek, Stephen Meek, having or showing a quiet and gentle nature


A slough is not somewhere meek people would want to go.


The very next thing you come to is the end of the road (the end is ever drawing nigh), the highway literally ends here (at Tower Junction - a castle’s central tower is a ‘keep’), but a highway never actually ends, it’s always (ever) ending.  


We can go either right or left onto the Grand Loop Road.  Does Forrest give us a hint as to which way?


Well, nigh actually means ‘on the left’.  And, if we go left, the first major feature is Devil’s Den (no place for the meek) and much further down the road is the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (new riches) and then Old Faithful (old riches).  Also, left would be clockwise.


So, I take it we go left.  What’s the first thing we come across if we do?  Tower Creek.  Which fits the next line perfectly (there’ll be no paddle up your creek), seeing as we can’t go up it - it’s a waterfall (water high)!


But, before we reach the falls, we have to drive right under Overhanging Cliff (a rather heavy load)!  Heavy loads and water high - are Overhanging Cliff and Tower Falls!  Not even 10 yards from each other.


So, now we’re just looking for a blaze…  There’s a giant blaze of white rock at Antelope Creek.


But, then the trail goes cold...

Is Ranger Brown’s old house the Home of Brown?

For years, people have been speculating that the Lamar Ranger Station is the ‘house of Brown.’  Probably because there was a Ranger Brown who lived there.  So, should we lend any credence to this theory?…


Yes and no.


On the surface, it seems to fit better than almost anyplace else.  


As you enter Yellowstone from the north, the first thing you see is Soda Butte Creek.


The name "Soda Butte" comes from a large, and largely dormant, hot spring cone that sits right next to the highway where Soda Butte Creek opens up into the Lamar Valley.”


Is Soda Butte our ‘alone’ & ‘warm waters’?

So, if the clues describe a road-map or sign-posts to the treasure, a ‘lone’ near-dormant hot spring is a good fit for ‘where warm waters halt’.  


If you were describing a trip starting at the entrance to Yellowstone, Soda Butte would be the place.  Then, right after it is a long canyon down (can’t seem to find a name for this canyon online, but it terminates at Ice Box Canyon - an ice box is definitely where warm waters halt - as is Highway 212, the road you take, as 212 degrees is the boiling-point of water and the temperature at which warm water turns into steam).  

After about 10 miles, the first human habitation comes into view, the Lamar Ranger Station!  And, the entire place is deep brown in color!

And, the Joe Brown Put-In seems to fit even better than the Lamar Ranger Station!  Verdict:  Plausible.

The Verdict:

Map of the Lamar Ranger Station in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

‘From there it’s no place for the meek’ could mean Slough Creek:


Slough:  a swamp, a lack of progress, a state of moral degradation or spiritual dejection


Meek - mild, submissive, humble, modest, Joseph Meek, Stephen Meek, having or showing a quiet and gentle nature


A slough is not somewhere meek people would want to go.