FENN CLUES

© 2016- FennClues.com   About Us | Links | Terms & Conditions | Buy the Book

THIS WAY to the NEXT CLUE

Go to Desktop Site

Alone and with your treasures bold?...  Hmmm...

Bold:


Treasures (along with the Riches that come later) could obviously mean the gold coins and nuggets.  And, it’s easy for people to make that assumption.  So, that makes it perfect as a clue.

Plus, add in the fact that treasures and riches are synonyms (and both are used in the same stanza), implies that the author is trying to make it stand out (via the repetition), and…


‘Treasures bold’ and ‘riches new & old’ almost definitely mean something important in regards to solving the poem.  Almost surely.  Hidden in plain sight.  Just like the gold.

Possible Interpretations:

Bold:  Willing to take risks, risk-taker, confident, courageous, strong


Old English:  Bald


There is a Bald Mountain right next to Jardine, Montana, which is right up from the Black Canyon of the Yellowstone, which is where Joe Brown discovered gold in Bear Creek, which is right by Crevice Mountain, which oddly doesn’t show up in Google.


There is also another Bald Mountain which is right next to Kirwin, Wyoming - just feet from another potential Fenn solve!  What an interesting coincidence!


The mountain on the other side of Kirwin?  Right, it just so happens to be Brown Mountain!


And, what river runs through Kirwin?  Right, the Wood River (in the wood)…


The surrounding features:  Chief Mountain (brave), Canyon Creek, Galena Creek (galena means lead, a heavy element)


The origin of the word treasure is actually thesaurus!  Thesauruses bold?


The first stanza has very odd punctuation, so it’s worth taking a moment to parse the entire sentence:


As I have [A] and [B], I can [C], and [D].


Where A is ‘gone alone in there’, B is ‘with my treasures bold’, etc...

Treasures & Riches

  1. Sapphire Creek
  2. Gem Pool
  3. Jewel Geyser
  4. Sapphire Pool
  5. Pearl Geyser
  6. Opal Terrace
  7. Emerald Spring
  8. Etc…


Why did he need to go alone in there first?  Before the treasures bold?  


And, why do we need to go in the same way?


‘Keep’ comes next, so keep an eye out for a Castle…  


Then something ‘secret’…


Then something ‘new and old’.

Other Ideas...:

The Bald solution is elegant and fits perfectly with both Kirwin, Wyoming and Joe Brown solves.  But, other than that...  There doesn’t seem to be too much helpful information in this line.  


Treasures probably relate to something (other than the unclaimed treasure chest and all the gold, of course), and bold almost certainly is a clue of some sort, but the rest of the words don’t seem to convey any meaningful information.  Useful to confirm a solve, otherwise not.

The Verdict: